Field Day

North America's Favorite Ham Radio Event
Field Day is a combination emergency preparedness exercise and Amateur Radio Contest sponsored yearly the the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) for amateur radio operators from the United States and Canada.

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WA3YLO, Tony Young and K8JW, John Williams pound out CW contacts

The ARRL Sponsors Field Day
To learn about the contest itself, read the ARRL Field Day web page. You will find complete rules for the contest listed there along with a host of other information.

Planning
At the Anne Arundel Radio Club, we literally start Field Day planning as soon as Field Day ends for the previous year. Three years ago we ran stations from three shelters spread across the grounds of the Davidsonville Family Recreation Center. Two years ago we went to a two shelter system, and strung two 80m dipoles end to end. Last year we switched to loop antennas, and co-located two of our three shelters. And this year we plan on co-locating all three shelters to maximize camaraderie. We'll use brand new low loss 450 ohm ladder-line feed line to minimize signal loss. And to put the cherry on top, a 400 foot long line of loop antennas to minimize inter-station interference. In other wise we are always trying something newer, and hopefully better. Sometimes it even works.

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AC3SS, Sergio Signorini surges on PSK31

History
The AARC has been competing in Field Day since the 1950s. Thirty years or so later we scored more points than any station in the country. A few years ago we won our division once again. But the real fun of Field Day is in sharing your hobby with your friends. In recent years we've dined on wood fired pizza for dinner, and home made potato chips in the middle of the night. We've trained a goodly number of new hams in the art of contesting, doing CW, phone and even digital modes. We have tried satellite contacts, and contacts on at least four UHF/VHF bands. On the low frequency end we've put up antennas over 250 feet long for 160 meters. Once we even tried to create a 130 foot tall 160 meter vertical to be held up with a helium filled balloon. Hey, it almost worked. And then there was the year our shelter flooded! Field day is all about camping with friends, staying up late, playing with radios and alternate power sources, having a great time playing with technology, and ending up with some great stories to tell. Be part of the story. Come join us.